Author Topic: Consoles you had the most and least fun collecting for?  (Read 2470 times)

Re: Consoles you had the most and least fun collecting for?
« Reply #45 on: November 05, 2021, 02:06:25 am »
What even counts as a "full set" anymore with modern systems? Does LGR count? Does all 50 of the copycat start-ups doing the same thing count? If I'd invest a bunch of money into a license to print physical copies of some indie game and start shipping them from my basement, does that become part of the "full set"?

I don't do that type of collecting, but if I did I don't think I'd count the physical game cottage industry as being an intergral part of that goal.


I guess technically it means every game released for a console ever. This is includes official releases, small independent releases, homebrews, bootlegs, and everything in between. Obviously this is an insane undertaking and very few have actually been able to accomplish it on certain consoles. I had a friend who was going for a full NES set and upon realizing he'd have to drop over a grand on crap like Cheetahmen 2 or Caltron 6 in 1 he said screw it and just went for licensed releases as his "full set."


As for the PS4, I think it will go down as one of the most interesting modern console libraries, however I do not envy anyone going for a full set because of all the Limited Run type releases as well as a decent chunk of games that were only releases through the publishers website like Ikaruga. It will be an insane feat for someone to do it, but you know eventually someone will. There are a ton of PS4 games I'd like to buy at one point, but this is a curated list of games I would like to play someday. I never understood the appeal of full set collecting, mostly because you're throwing a ton of money away of annual sports titles, shovelware, and just games you have no interest in. The only console I ever for a second considered going for a full set for is the NTSC/US Dreamcast given my love for it and its relatively small library of games. One day I had the chance to buy some sports titles I needed for about $2 each. Even at $2 I struggled to purchase them and ended up passing on them and any plans to ever go for a full set.

sworddude

Re: Consoles you had the most and least fun collecting for?
« Reply #46 on: November 05, 2021, 11:51:33 am »
What even counts as a "full set" anymore with modern systems? Does LGR count? Does all 50 of the copycat start-ups doing the same thing count? If I'd invest a bunch of money into a license to print physical copies of some indie game and start shipping them from my basement, does that become part of the "full set"?

I don't do that type of collecting, but if I did I don't think I'd count the physical game cottage industry as being an intergral part of that goal.


I guess technically it means every game released for a console ever. This is includes official releases, small independent releases, homebrews, bootlegs, and everything in between. Obviously this is an insane undertaking and very few have actually been able to accomplish it on certain consoles. I had a friend who was going for a full NES set and upon realizing he'd have to drop over a grand on crap like Cheetahmen 2 or Caltron 6 in 1 he said screw it and just went for licensed releases as his "full set."


As for the PS4, I think it will go down as one of the most interesting modern console libraries, however I do not envy anyone going for a full set because of all the Limited Run type releases as well as a decent chunk of games that were only releases through the publishers website like Ikaruga. It will be an insane feat for someone to do it, but you know eventually someone will. There are a ton of PS4 games I'd like to buy at one point, but this is a curated list of games I would like to play someday. I never understood the appeal of full set collecting, mostly because you're throwing a ton of money away of annual sports titles, shovelware, and just games you have no interest in. The only console I ever for a second considered going for a full set for is the NTSC/US Dreamcast given my love for it and its relatively small library of games. One day I had the chance to buy some sports titles I needed for about $2 each. Even at $2 I struggled to purchase them and ended up passing on them and any plans to ever go for a full set.

releases from companies such as limited run games are however official releases this ain't the same stuff as action 51 cheetaman caultron bible games etc etc. These are not offbrand unoffical/ pirated bootleg releases. They had to ask permission from the actual developers aswell plus a share in the profits. plus where also talking retro titles with bigger brand names such as Castlevania. or rerelases of older starwars titles wich are classics on say the OG xbox or titles such as panzer dragoon just to name some examples.

Companies such as limited run are in the first tier alongside releases from sony themselves. unless you'd seperate triple A games with lesser budget games. It is however fairly easy to seperate but how far would one go is the question, are other smaller companies with just a few phsyical game releases in this tier aswell?

we can't compare this to atari days in wich someone in his basement made 10 to 100 copies of 1 game in their garage. It's usually a couple thousand copies at least with only fewer numbers for the collectors editions wich still are usually in the couple thousand copies range. not to mention that limited run games has releases that far exceed the 10K copy limit of games such as panzer dragoon saga wich is considered part of a sega saturn full set.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2021, 12:07:51 pm by sworddude »
Your Stylish Sword Master!



Warmsignal

Re: Consoles you had the most and least fun collecting for?
« Reply #47 on: November 05, 2021, 12:10:59 pm »
What even counts as a "full set" anymore with modern systems? Does LGR count? Does all 50 of the copycat start-ups doing the same thing count? If I'd invest a bunch of money into a license to print physical copies of some indie game and start shipping them from my basement, does that become part of the "full set"?

I don't do that type of collecting, but if I did I don't think I'd count the physical game cottage industry as being an intergral part of that goal.


I guess technically it means every game released for a console ever. This is includes official releases, small independent releases, homebrews, bootlegs, and everything in between. Obviously this is an insane undertaking and very few have actually been able to accomplish it on certain consoles. I had a friend who was going for a full NES set and upon realizing he'd have to drop over a grand on crap like Cheetahmen 2 or Caltron 6 in 1 he said screw it and just went for licensed releases as his "full set."


As for the PS4, I think it will go down as one of the most interesting modern console libraries, however I do not envy anyone going for a full set because of all the Limited Run type releases as well as a decent chunk of games that were only releases through the publishers website like Ikaruga. It will be an insane feat for someone to do it, but you know eventually someone will. There are a ton of PS4 games I'd like to buy at one point, but this is a curated list of games I would like to play someday. I never understood the appeal of full set collecting, mostly because you're throwing a ton of money away of annual sports titles, shovelware, and just games you have no interest in. The only console I ever for a second considered going for a full set for is the NTSC/US Dreamcast given my love for it and its relatively small library of games. One day I had the chance to buy some sports titles I needed for about $2 each. Even at $2 I struggled to purchase them and ended up passing on them and any plans to ever go for a full set.

Yeah I like just having the stuff that I wanna play, and that alone already maximizes the capacity of all five of my floor to ceiling game shelves as it is, ridiculous as that sounds. If I sold my collection of JRPGs I could free a bit of space for each system. That's a type of game that I thought I was interested to play at one time, but realized that I'm not. Save for just a handful of series like Tales, maybe Final Fantasy, and few one-offs.

I attempted a Wii U set once, fell short of a few hundred dollar a piece shovelware games, gave up and purged all of the trash out of my Wii U collection. I'm still left with the shameful memories of spending a day, going around to various shops and buying shovelware crap all day. It was regrettable.

Warmsignal

Re: Consoles you had the most and least fun collecting for?
« Reply #48 on: November 05, 2021, 12:24:00 pm »

we can't compare this to atari days in wich someone in his basement made 10 to 100 copies of 1 game in their garage. It's usually a couple thousand copies at least with only fewer numbers for the collectors editions wich still are usually in the couple thousand copies range. not to mention that limited run games has releases that far exceed the 10K copy limit of games such as panzer dragoon saga wich is considered part of a sega saturn full set.

How different are they, really? If we could physically see the operations of LRG, would it just be a few dudes running out of a small rented office building? How many of their competitors are probably literally doing the same from a basement? Do those count? Because now there's a bunch of people doing the same business model. Back in the 2600 days there were independently owned toy stores that would contract people with programming skills to make a 2600 game for them to sell in their store. They might have sold 1000, maybe 500, or maybe just 100. Some people consider that stuff part of the 2600 set.

If I was going for a full set, all that would count would be games which made their way through reputable retail venues, as a product that anyone could buy upon release. Not just those in the know of it's release date, with a pre-order requirement direct from manufacture to consumer. To me, it's not really a proper retail game. Gets into that grey area of being more of a novelty item.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2021, 12:26:05 pm by Warmsignal »

sworddude

Re: Consoles you had the most and least fun collecting for?
« Reply #49 on: November 05, 2021, 01:19:22 pm »

we can't compare this to atari days in wich someone in his basement made 10 to 100 copies of 1 game in their garage. It's usually a couple thousand copies at least with only fewer numbers for the collectors editions wich still are usually in the couple thousand copies range. not to mention that limited run games has releases that far exceed the 10K copy limit of games such as panzer dragoon saga wich is considered part of a sega saturn full set.

How different are they, really? If we could physically see the operations of LRG, would it just be a few dudes running out of a small rented office building? How many of their competitors are probably literally doing the same from a basement? Do those count? Because now there's a bunch of people doing the same business model. Back in the 2600 days there were independently owned toy stores that would contract people with programming skills to make a 2600 game for them to sell in their store. They might have sold 1000, maybe 500, or maybe just 100. Some people consider that stuff part of the 2600 set.

If I was going for a full set, all that would count would be games which made their way through reputable retail venues, as a product that anyone could buy upon release. Not just those in the know of it's release date, with a pre-order requirement direct from manufacture to consumer. To me, it's not really a proper retail game. Gets into that grey area of being more of a novelty item.

so your saying that the discs art work etc are all house made withouth any help of 3rd parties?

I find that hard to believe plus the volume being at least a couple thousand minimum. plus I can't imagine them making their own switch carts. There's got to be some help from a factory with these amounts. If I had to guess The only thing that happens in these office building has got to be the shipping part, or at the very most just getting all the things together to complete a collectors edition when all products are already done. or fitting them cards with the normal releases. It's far to big to compare to those atari examples.

and again where also talking bigger brand names such as castlevania being in here not just indi titles. we also have bigger retro releases here wich where considered part of a full set on past consoles. plus the konami Brand. or what about the panzer dragoon remaster wich is an ip of sega.

I'll say this though your description is a nice way to seperate these kinds of games from the rest. At the very end of the day everyone is going to collect how they want, it doesn't really matter what other people think. multiple definitions of a ps4 official full set will exist

also I'm fairly sure limited run had amazon releases of same games but with a different cover. not for all games but for a smaller selection
« Last Edit: November 05, 2021, 01:32:15 pm by sworddude »
Your Stylish Sword Master!



Warmsignal

Re: Consoles you had the most and least fun collecting for?
« Reply #50 on: November 05, 2021, 02:00:11 pm »

we can't compare this to atari days in wich someone in his basement made 10 to 100 copies of 1 game in their garage. It's usually a couple thousand copies at least with only fewer numbers for the collectors editions wich still are usually in the couple thousand copies range. not to mention that limited run games has releases that far exceed the 10K copy limit of games such as panzer dragoon saga wich is considered part of a sega saturn full set.

How different are they, really? If we could physically see the operations of LRG, would it just be a few dudes running out of a small rented office building? How many of their competitors are probably literally doing the same from a basement? Do those count? Because now there's a bunch of people doing the same business model. Back in the 2600 days there were independently owned toy stores that would contract people with programming skills to make a 2600 game for them to sell in their store. They might have sold 1000, maybe 500, or maybe just 100. Some people consider that stuff part of the 2600 set.

If I was going for a full set, all that would count would be games which made their way through reputable retail venues, as a product that anyone could buy upon release. Not just those in the know of it's release date, with a pre-order requirement direct from manufacture to consumer. To me, it's not really a proper retail game. Gets into that grey area of being more of a novelty item.

so your saying that the discs art work etc are all house made withouth any help of 3rd parties?

I find that hard to believe plus the volume being at least a couple thousand minimum. plus I can't imagine them making their own switch carts. There's got to be some help from a factory with these amounts. If I had to guess The only thing that happens in these office building has got to be the shipping part, or at the very most just getting all the things together to complete a collectors edition when all products are already done. or fitting them cards with the normal releases. It's far to big to compare to those atari examples.

and again where also talking bigger brand names such as castlevania being in here not just indi titles. we also have bigger retro releases here wich where considered part of a full set on past consoles. plus the konami Brand. or what about the panzer dragoon remaster wich is an ip of sega.

I'll say this though your description is a nice way to seperate these kinds of games from the rest. At the very end of the day everyone is going to collect how they want, it doesn't really matter what other people think. multiple definitions of a ps4 official full set will exist

also I'm fairly sure limited run had amazon releases of same games but with a different cover. not for all games but for a smaller selection

Yeah, it's even more grey for the grey area. LRG sells some of their games via retail now, at Best Buy. I guess those would count as retail games. However, a lot of these cottage industry types are usually not the rights holders for the games they're printing copies of, they're just licensed to sell copies of them. Most of the titles are releases which were already made available for download from the publisher.

You can buy all the supplies you need from Nintendo with a business license and cash to buy in bulk, and you can print little inserts and labels yourself, or have it done, no problem. That's partly why LRG use to print in such small quantities. 2000 was probably the smallest affordable investment for them to make in the supplies, since in manufacturing you can only buy in bulk amounts. They wanted to make damn sure they sold everything they purchased so they didn't go in the hole gambling on how much they'd be able to sell. They found their niche, they hyped a bunch of people on it, and they turned a predictable profit every single time with people manic to buy in that small window of time, as well as having scalpers there to ensure everything was sold each time.

It's a much bigger financial risk when you invest in a much larger amount of supplies, and one most of the LRG types will never take. They're riding on the novelty of having a "super limited" item to actually sell all of their investment so it works out. I'd imagine they're already are unhappy with the pre-order model because it means they need to order a certain bulk amount to fulfill that, and probably have some investment left over and unused. However, LRG has made such a name for themselves now with their following, they could probably just run a proper retail shop on their website and let people buy a la carte. I doubt they could go wrong at this point.
 
« Last Edit: November 05, 2021, 02:04:50 pm by Warmsignal »

Re: Consoles you had the most and least fun collecting for?
« Reply #51 on: November 06, 2021, 12:22:19 am »


If I sold my collection of JRPGs I could free a bit of space for each system. That's a type of game that I thought I was interested to play at one time, but realized that I'm not. Save for just a handful of series like Tales, maybe Final Fantasy, and few one-offs.



This was 100% me as well.


I was a late bloomer to the JRPG scene. A neighbor and friend of my brother's got me into FF7 around 2000 or so and I was totally blown away by it. I played most of the Final Fantasy games, both PS1 Lunar games (never beat either though), and a spattering of other PS1 and PS2 JRPGs during the early to mid 2000s. I got out of gaming briefly in the mid to late 2000s and when I got back into it and began collecting, JRPGs were at the very top of my want list. I pretty much bought any JRPG I could get my hands on, however after years of acquiring most of the very best in the genre released in the west between the SNES era to the modern era of gaming I realized I just wasn't the JRPG fan I used to be.


I did thoroughly enjoy playing Xenoblade and Chrono Trigger for the first time in recent years, however I quickly got bored with probably 80% of the JRPGs I tried playing. I eventually came to terms with the fact that I loved the idea of being a JRPG fan more than I was an actual JRPG fan. I've since sold a pretty good chunk of my JRPG collection, mostly on more modern consoles, but still. My wife is still big on the genre and is actually playing Tales of Arise as I type this lol. I hope someday I can get back into JRPGs like I used to be, but sadly I don't see that happening.

Re: Consoles you had the most and least fun collecting for?
« Reply #52 on: November 06, 2021, 12:28:03 am »

I attempted a Wii U set once, fell short of a few hundred dollar a piece shovelware games, gave up and purged all of the trash out of my Wii U collection. I'm still left with the shameful memories of spending a day, going around to various shops and buying shovelware crap all day. It was regrettable.


I know a local collector that is actually going for a sealed Wii U set right now and I believe he's down to single digits in terms of what he needs to complete the set. It's literally all rare shovelware that is needed and probably the last 20 or so games he's needed have been shovelware as well. Beyond a good investment someday I can't even imagine doing a full set for that console or the Wii which is like 90% shovelware. It's hard to say what the future of Wii U collecting holds. Given the console was a flop and most of its best games have been ported to the Switch, it might just hold the distinction as that one Nintendo console very few people care about collecting for. Sure some will because, you know, Nintendo, but I have a feeling it will probably be one of the most underwhelming collecting scenes out there.