Author Topic: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?  (Read 232 times)

Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« on: November 14, 2017, 02:58:19 pm »
Probably pretty much one of the most expensive NA release PS2 games. I'm planning on trading a few games I don't want anymore to get it.  But would you say it is as rare as it's price says. I know it depicts violence to children so it was pulled fast but is it really that rare? Or is it just really popular right now. I see a lot of people trying to hunt it down. Is that why the price is up. Will it cool off?

turf

PRO Supporter

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 03:05:53 pm »
Welcome to the forums for starters.

I think Rule of Rose is very hard to find.  I've never played it, but I think folks seem to like it. It's survival horror and folks love that stuff.

Good luck finding a good price on it.  I hope you can get one. 


sworddude

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2017, 03:39:52 pm »
it really depends what kind of a person you are and how much you care about the cost of an item.

Some people find 20 dollars for a 3d mario title or super smash bros way to much, while a random title for a few bucks is a ok for them. if you going with such standards you will barely play any good games unless you are lucky and are into racing games, gta sports and some random platformers and the common ps2 mascots wich sold very well.

And than you have some that spend hundreds on a game and find it totally worth it for certain shoot em ups 2d platformers etc fans of certain genre's no matter how short or long a certain game is and ofcourse the people in between not willing to spend beyond a certain amount

Gameplay wise you could run an emulator, or you could buy the original finish it and sell it on with a small loss. With modern consoles It's quite a common tactic however I have seen this trend as of late for the more pricy older games pretty interesting.


« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 03:43:51 pm by sworddude »
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doctorlaudanum

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2017, 03:48:58 pm »
Honestly, I think it depends on if you're the type of person to get invested in a game's story. I love a lot of bad games, but Rule of Rose was nearly unplayable for me at times. Its story and art direction are its main strengths, though it will try its hardest to hide that plot from you for the bulk of the game. If you're a survival horror fan, it's certainly unique in its presentation. I'd say it's more disturbing than scary, though. Definitely didn't deserve all the controversy it received. Maybe consider an LP? I also got it for waaaay cheaper than market value, so I may be a little biased.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 03:50:43 pm by doctorlaudanum »
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Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2017, 04:29:33 pm »
I believe a member here was selling a copy for a decent price a while back.  I almost bought it, but I wound up getting my copy for quite a bit less.

Still haven't played it... what can you do?


Warmsignal

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2017, 09:07:46 pm »
No.

Most games aren't worth their $60 retail prices, if you ask me. That's not a complaint against the quality of the games themselves, but a complaint against the price point relative to what the product is. Most of the games I like are between 8 and 12 hours worth of content, and you're lucky if it's designed to have any replayability. $60 is just too much for most games, and always has been. Anything above that, and the appraisal is as a collector's piece and it's certainly exceeded the value of the game experience. As long as game collecting remains hot, the price will not cool off.

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2017, 10:10:17 pm »
No.

Rule of Rose is a rare game, it was published by a respected company in the industry (Atlus), and is part of a genre of games that enjoy above average values (Survival Horror). I have played very few games worth over a hundred bucks that are worth their weight in cash, and this one certainly does not have its price because of how good it is. Watching a few reviews on youtube should give you all the evidence you need to back up what I am saying.

sworddude

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2017, 04:55:32 am »
No.

Most games aren't worth their $60 retail prices, if you ask me. That's not a complaint against the quality of the games themselves, but a complaint against the price point relative to what the product is. Most of the games I like are between 8 and 12 hours worth of content, and you're lucky if it's designed to have any replayability. $60 is just too much for most games, and always has been. Anything above that, and the appraisal is as a collector's piece and it's certainly exceeded the value of the game experience. As long as game collecting remains hot, the price will not cool off.

every game is worth it's retail price in the very beginning, people want to join in on the hype train not to mention that games with lower production costs had a lower retail price from the very start with sometimes only 20$ brand new for a physical copy in stores. Your also paying for the experience of the newest games wich also has it's price.

Also don't forget that it costs allot of money to produce a game, while the packaging and CD might be a couple of dollars or even allot less, the value is in the content that people had to spend time and resources on to produce not to mention the adds to promote a game if you want the game to be sold well.

Without those high retail prices companies won't gain enough money to make a profit or make a new game.

As far as expensive games go, there are only a few games that are totally worth it for the price point.

However if you have enough cash I would throw that statement out of the window since plenty of those expensive games are excellent wich many would love to play and in those very few instances even better than some of the better classics.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 06:17:30 am by sworddude »
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kashell

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2017, 08:39:03 am »
I found it for a good price and enjoyed it for the most part. But, with the way it's going these days? I'd say no. It's really short, it's very clunky, you have to work to get the most of the story revealed, and there is a terrible boss fight that will make even the most patient gamers fume.

If you can find it for a reasonable price, then I say play it.

https://www.gamefaqs.com/ps2/930042-rule-of-rose/reviews/161299
If you make me your enemy, you make the world your enemy.
                                私は世界を変える。


Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2017, 10:19:27 am »
No.

Most games aren't worth their $60 retail prices, if you ask me. That's not a complaint against the quality of the games themselves, but a complaint against the price point relative to what the product is. Most of the games I like are between 8 and 12 hours worth of content, and you're lucky if it's designed to have any replayability. $60 is just too much for most games, and always has been. Anything above that, and the appraisal is as a collector's piece and it's certainly exceeded the value of the game experience. As long as game collecting remains hot, the price will not cool off.

every game is worth it's retail price in the very beginning, people want to join in on the hype train not to mention that games with lower production costs had a lower retail price from the very start with sometimes only 20$ brand new for a physical copy in stores. Your also paying for the experience of the newest games wich also has it's price.

Also don't forget that it costs allot of money to produce a game, while the packaging and CD might be a couple of dollars or even allot less, the value is in the content that people had to spend time and resources on to produce not to mention the adds to promote a game if you want the game to be sold well.

Without those high retail prices companies won't gain enough money to make a profit or make a new game.

As far as expensive games go, there are only a few games that are totally worth it for the price point.

However if you have enough cash I would throw that statement out of the window since plenty of those expensive games are excellent wich many would love to play and in those very few instances even better than some of the better classics.


This game retailed at $50, maybe $60 and how does the publisher/dev profit from selling a used copy of their games? Even if someone scored a new copy of it, the money that was exchanged that actually went to Atlus happened years ago when the game first came out. I can assure you that Atlus has not seen a dime for this game in 10-years. It's going price now has nothing to do with the profits for the people that made the game and everything to do with collector demand and price speculation.


And from my experience  I've found that most of the cheaper games that sold really well are the ones worth buying; they sold really well for a good reason, and while sales are not a 100% accurate marker of quality, they often are. Often games that have prices well beyond their original msrp are games that have been inflated by collectors due to rarity or perceived quality. A game like Hagane which is a decent game goes for over $500 loose because of how rare it is, not because it is 10x better than Contra 4 or Castlevania IV. Don't get me wrong, there are definitely exceptions to this, I've just found from experience as a gamer and a collector that 9/10 your super rare, expensive games are not as good as their cheaper, more common counterparts that sold really well.

sworddude

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2017, 11:39:00 am »
No.

Most games aren't worth their $60 retail prices, if you ask me. That's not a complaint against the quality of the games themselves, but a complaint against the price point relative to what the product is. Most of the games I like are between 8 and 12 hours worth of content, and you're lucky if it's designed to have any replayability. $60 is just too much for most games, and always has been. Anything above that, and the appraisal is as a collector's piece and it's certainly exceeded the value of the game experience. As long as game collecting remains hot, the price will not cool off.

every game is worth it's retail price in the very beginning, people want to join in on the hype train not to mention that games with lower production costs had a lower retail price from the very start with sometimes only 20$ brand new for a physical copy in stores. Your also paying for the experience of the newest games wich also has it's price.

Also don't forget that it costs allot of money to produce a game, while the packaging and CD might be a couple of dollars or even allot less, the value is in the content that people had to spend time and resources on to produce not to mention the adds to promote a game if you want the game to be sold well.

Without those high retail prices companies won't gain enough money to make a profit or make a new game.

As far as expensive games go, there are only a few games that are totally worth it for the price point.

However if you have enough cash I would throw that statement out of the window since plenty of those expensive games are excellent wich many would love to play and in those very few instances even better than some of the better classics.


This game retailed at $50, maybe $60 and how does the publisher/dev profit from selling a used copy of their games? Even if someone scored a new copy of it, the money that was exchanged that actually went to Atlus happened years ago when the game first came out. I can assure you that Atlus has not seen a dime for this game in 10-years. It's going price now has nothing to do with the profits for the people that made the game and everything to do with collector demand and price speculation.


And from my experience  I've found that most of the cheaper games that sold really well are the ones worth buying; they sold really well for a good reason, and while sales are not a 100% accurate marker of quality, they often are. Often games that have prices well beyond their original msrp are games that have been inflated by collectors due to rarity or perceived quality. A game like Hagane which is a decent game goes for over $500 loose because of how rare it is, not because it is 10x better than Contra 4 or Castlevania IV. Don't get me wrong, there are definitely exceptions to this, I've just found from experience as a gamer and a collector that 9/10 your super rare, expensive games are not as good as their cheaper, more common counterparts that sold really well.

Read my comments very closely my friend  ;)

Not to mention that my last note was if you were rich and had to much money to spend anyways plenty of excellent titles in that high tier list. Hagane is excellent if you like real difficult games, many people bash it since it is to difficult, while it has great grapics and gameplay. I've noticed that allot of mainstream gamers bash games wich are to hard with some exceptions if you would like my opinion.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 11:46:40 am by sworddude »
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Warmsignal

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2017, 03:08:58 pm »
No.

Most games aren't worth their $60 retail prices, if you ask me. That's not a complaint against the quality of the games themselves, but a complaint against the price point relative to what the product is. Most of the games I like are between 8 and 12 hours worth of content, and you're lucky if it's designed to have any replayability. $60 is just too much for most games, and always has been. Anything above that, and the appraisal is as a collector's piece and it's certainly exceeded the value of the game experience. As long as game collecting remains hot, the price will not cool off.

every game is worth it's retail price in the very beginning, people want to join in on the hype train not to mention that games with lower production costs had a lower retail price from the very start with sometimes only 20$ brand new for a physical copy in stores. Your also paying for the experience of the newest games wich also has it's price.

Also don't forget that it costs allot of money to produce a game, while the packaging and CD might be a couple of dollars or even allot less, the value is in the content that people had to spend time and resources on to produce not to mention the adds to promote a game if you want the game to be sold well.

Without those high retail prices companies won't gain enough money to make a profit or make a new game.

As far as expensive games go, there are only a few games that are totally worth it for the price point.

However if you have enough cash I would throw that statement out of the window since plenty of those expensive games are excellent wich many would love to play and in those very few instances even better than some of the better classics.

I have to disagree. Every new game, or near every new game is precisely worth $60? I think that $60 is more like a number that just stuck. Taking a look at all of the variables - not every game, including games with larger budgets costs exactly the same to produce and promote. Some of them don't engage in any promotion and are still $60. Some of them are just HD revamps, or compilations and they're $60.

This is the integral flaw in the business model of video games. So they spend a fortune to produce a niche product (relatively speaking), and this is a problem. They feel like they need to charge a high amount to profit from the product, but many people do not buy brand new video game precisely because $60 to many work-a-day people is a lot of money to drop on something that isn't necessary to have, and there are tons of them out there on the market for the same price point, so there's no way most of them are going to do very well. And yet, price is not flexible. Lots of publishers and developers found out the hard way, what happens when you spend spectacularly making something and then nobody wants, or likes it.

The seemingly logical thing to do, would be not spend so much money producing a game, and still make it a good enough game that it'll sell well and make a profit. I often pick up new releases that are considered "budget" titles on PS4, but that doesn't equate to being a bad product in today's market. There's plenty of good games that didn't cost a tremendous fortune to make, and didn't spend heavily on adverting that are worthwhile. I'd think publishers make lots of money on Steam when they decide to drop the price of their games down.

The way I see it, out of ten people there may be one willing to plunk down $60 to have that brand new release, while the other nine will hold out for a price drop to something like $30, or less. There's no way they were going to get $600 out of all of those potential customers on day one, but maybe they could have gotten $300, instead of allowing a third party to profit from reselling used copies from which they'll never see a dime. I'm not even claiming to be a business minded kind of person, but that seems logical to me.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 03:11:09 pm by Warmsignal »

sworddude

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2017, 04:05:01 pm »
No.

Most games aren't worth their $60 retail prices, if you ask me. That's not a complaint against the quality of the games themselves, but a complaint against the price point relative to what the product is. Most of the games I like are between 8 and 12 hours worth of content, and you're lucky if it's designed to have any replayability. $60 is just too much for most games, and always has been. Anything above that, and the appraisal is as a collector's piece and it's certainly exceeded the value of the game experience. As long as game collecting remains hot, the price will not cool off.

every game is worth it's retail price in the very beginning, people want to join in on the hype train not to mention that games with lower production costs had a lower retail price from the very start with sometimes only 20$ brand new for a physical copy in stores. Your also paying for the experience of the newest games wich also has it's price.

Also don't forget that it costs allot of money to produce a game, while the packaging and CD might be a couple of dollars or even allot less, the value is in the content that people had to spend time and resources on to produce not to mention the adds to promote a game if you want the game to be sold well.

Without those high retail prices companies won't gain enough money to make a profit or make a new game.

As far as expensive games go, there are only a few games that are totally worth it for the price point.

However if you have enough cash I would throw that statement out of the window since plenty of those expensive games are excellent wich many would love to play and in those very few instances even better than some of the better classics.

I have to disagree. Every new game, or near every new game is precisely worth $60? I think that $60 is more like a number that just stuck. Taking a look at all of the variables - not every game, including games with larger budgets costs exactly the same to produce and promote. Some of them don't engage in any promotion and are still $60. Some of them are just HD revamps, or compilations and they're $60.

This is the integral flaw in the business model of video games. So they spend a fortune to produce a niche product (relatively speaking), and this is a problem. They feel like they need to charge a high amount to profit from the product, but many people do not buy brand new video game precisely because $60 to many work-a-day people is a lot of money to drop on something that isn't necessary to have, and there are tons of them out there on the market for the same price point, so there's no way most of them are going to do very well. And yet, price is not flexible. Lots of publishers and developers found out the hard way, what happens when you spend spectacularly making something and then nobody wants, or likes it.

The seemingly logical thing to do, would be not spend so much money producing a game, and still make it a good enough game that it'll sell well and make a profit. I often pick up new releases that are considered "budget" titles on PS4, but that doesn't equate to being a bad product in today's market. There's plenty of good games that didn't cost a tremendous fortune to make, and didn't spend heavily on adverting that are worthwhile. I'd think publishers make lots of money on Steam when they decide to drop the price of their games down.

The way I see it, out of ten people there may be one willing to plunk down $60 to have that brand new release, while the other nine will hold out for a price drop to something like $30, or less. There's no way they were going to get $600 out of all of those potential customers on day one, but maybe they could have gotten $300, instead of allowing a third party to profit from reselling used copies from which they'll never see a dime. I'm not even claiming to be a business minded kind of person, but that seems logical to me.

Many games aren't even 60$ from the very beginning never has been to be fair.

The mario sport titles on the wii u were 30 - 40 $ brand new from the start just to name one example, there are even titles wich were 20 from the very beginning.

Usually first party titles are in the highest price range of 60$.

Also about HD remakes, for example FF X and X-2 crash bandicoot last of us etc, Pretty beloved games and the best way to play them, plenty of people who pay full price from the very beginning since they want the best experience and they support the company.

Since in this case while it is a cash grab with allot less effort why not profit from it. I guess not many people understand that companies need to make a profit and milk certain things to the fullest. Money talks that's just how the world works, videogames are no exception.

Also many games wich drop fast in price profit from the hype train, the first month is a time to recoup some money in their investment since games get sold for the full 60$ before they drop in price.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 05:39:43 pm by sworddude »
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Warmsignal

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2017, 06:11:06 pm »

Since in this case while it is a cash grab with allot less effort why not profit from it. I guess not many people understand that companies need to make a profit and milk certain things to the fullest. Money talks that's just how the world works, videogames are no exception.


I completely understand that, but I see two potential business strategies here. One being, charge the highest price you possibly can and try to maximize profits all within a short span of time. Or, sell the product at a much more competitive price, so that more people actually buy it and buy it from you (the producer) and not a reseller, and wait for a more steady return on the game, which might even be more profitable in the long run if more people bought it.

Quit frankly, I don't understand why video games go out of print as soon as sales start to decline. As where books, movies, CDs, etc, have continuous print for the most part. Those products continue to make profit, long after they release. Digital distribution markets show us that the same can be said for games, if the price point is right. I'm sticking to the theory that price is a major factor in why games don't sell more than they do, and it's precisely why used game stores is such a huge business. People want the games, but don't want to pay exorbitant prices.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 06:12:39 pm by Warmsignal »

sworddude

Re: Is Rule of Rose worth it's price?
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2017, 06:30:40 pm »

Since in this case while it is a cash grab with allot less effort why not profit from it. I guess not many people understand that companies need to make a profit and milk certain things to the fullest. Money talks that's just how the world works, videogames are no exception.


I completely understand that, but I see two potential business strategies here. One being, charge the highest price you possibly can and try to maximize profits all within a short span of time. Or, sell the product at a much more competitive price, so that more people actually buy it and buy it from you (the producer) and not a reseller, and wait for a more steady return on the game, which might even be more profitable in the long run if more people bought it.

Quit frankly, I don't understand why video games go out of print as soon as sales start to decline. As where books, movies, CDs, etc, have continuous print for the most part. Those products continue to make profit, long after they release. Digital distribution markets show us that the same can be said for games, if the price point is right. I'm sticking to the theory that price is a major factor in why games don't sell more than they do, and it's precisely why used game stores is such a huge business. People want the games, but don't want to pay exorbitant prices.

I'm pretty sure most game companies do this already for the less popular games

They first sell it for 60$ in the first few weeks to a month, afterwards it lowers in price allot brand new in stores so that the other people will go and get the game. so in the end you have the same amount of buyers however an extra chunk of cash since there is a group who spends the full price right at release.

real popular games do it after a longer time however usually with a platinum version etc.
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